Doctor Doctor Who Guide

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On This Day (USA) - 21 April



Planet of the Daleks: Episode Three premiered on BBC One in 1973 at 5:53pm, watched by 10.10 million viewers.

In the Dalek city, the Doctor breaks out of his prison cell and joins forces with the Thals. With the Daleks in pursuit, he is forced to improvise a daring escape plan.



The Long Game premiered on SyFy (East Coast Feed) in 2006 at 9:00pm

Daleks in Manhattan premiered on BBC One in 2007 at 6:36pm, watched by 6.69 million viewers.

A New York Story premiered on BBC Three in 2007 at 7:25pm
 Birthdays
Hadley Fraser was 37 - credited as Gareth Evans in Army of Ghosts / Doomsday

Hadley Fraser is an English stage actor. He made his critically acclaimed West End debut as Marius in Les Misérables. He also originated the role of Tiernan in the Broadway show The Pirate Queen.

Fraser is the son of Jack and Carol Fraser, and brother of Ed Fraser, an officer in the British Army. He holds a BA from Birmingham University and a Postgraduate Diploma from the Royal Academy of Music. In 2011 he was made an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music, or ARAM.

His West End and other British credits include Les Misérables as Marius, Grantaire, and Javert, AssassinsThe Far PavilionsThe Shaughraun, and Pacific Overtures. He played Gareth in the Doctor Who episode "Army of Ghosts" (2006). As a vocalist he can be heard on Scott Alan's releases Keys and Scott Alan LIVE.

In 2009, Fraser played the supporting role of Reed in The Fresh Beat Band season 1. (In season 2, Reed was played by Patrick Levis.) In May 2010, he returned to the West End to play the role of El Gallo in The Fantasticks.

In October 2010, Fraser sang the Les Misérables role of Grantaire in the 25th Anniversary concert.

Hadley is currently writing music in a band called "Sheytoons" with Ramin Karimloo, who costarred as Enjolras on the 25th Anniversary concert of Les Misérables and co-starred as 'The Phantom' in the 25th anniversary of 'The Phantom of the Opera' (in which Hadley played Raoul).

On June 23, 2011, Fraser returned to Les Misérables, this time to play the role of Javert. He has since received critical acclaim for the role and is currently contracted to remain with the show until June 2012.

On October 1 and 2, 2011, Fraser played Raoul in the 25th Anniversary staging of The Phantom of the Opera at the Royal Albert Hall in London. He costarred with Karimloo, who played the Phantom in the show.

Fraser will appear in the film adaptation of Les Misérables as the Army General of the National Guard.

Biography from the Wikipedia article, licensed under CC-BY-SA



Anthony Read (died 2015 aged 80) would have been 82 - 10 credits, including Script Editor for Underworld

Anthony Read was a British script editor, television writer and author who was script editor of Doctor Who from 1978-1980.

He was active in British television from the 1960s to the mid-1980s, although he occasionally contributed to televised productions until 1999. 

In the 1980s, he launched a second career as a print author, concentrating largely on World War II histories. Since 2004 he has regularly written prose fiction, mainly in the form of a revival of his popular 1983 television show, The Baker Street Boys.

Read'searliest work was as a freelance writer for Z-Cars in 1962. He  graduated to writer/script editor of several other adventure-mystery series, like the anthological Detective, The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling and Peter Cushing's 1965 Sherlock Holmes vehicle. The remainderof the decade was spent on the adult drama, The Troubleshooters. 

By 1978, Read had been recruited to Doctor Who by producer Graham Williams. Read's biggest personal stamp on the long-running science fantasy show was shaping the "Key to Time" story arc, and the introducing the character of Romana. 

Read was instrumental in commissioning Douglas Adams as a Doctor Who writer, and for advocating the Hitchhiker's Guide author to be his replacement as script editor. His final contribution to Doctor Who was as scriptwriter for The Horns of Nimon. 

mmediately following his stint on Doctor Who in 1979, he contributed the scripts for the episodes Powers of Darkness and Out of Body, Out of Mind to the paranormal thriller series The Omega Factor

Together with Don Houghton, he co-wrote the fifth Sapphire & Steel television story, known informally as Dr McDee Must Die.In 1984 Read adapted the John Wyndham novel, Chocky, for Children's ITV. Its success led to two original sequels: Chocky's Children and Chocky's Challenge. In an interview for the DVD release of Chocky, Read revealed that the Wyndham estate considered his adaptation of Chocky to be the best adaptation ever produced from Wyndham's novels.

Read's biggest critical success of the 1980s, however, was 1983's The Baker Street Boys. The series garnered Read an award from the Writer's Guild of Great Britain.

During the 1980s, Read gradually began to replace his television work with a burgeoning career in print. He remains an active author as of 2009.



Gerald Flood (died 1989 aged 61) would have been 90 - 4 credits, including Voice of Kamelion in Planet of Fire

Gerald Flood  was a British actor of stage and television.

He provided the voice of Kamelion, a short lived companion of Fifth Doctor Peter Davison.

Flood was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire but lived for most of his life in Farnham, Surrey, where he regularly appeared on stage at the Castle Theatre. He first came to national prominence whist starring alongside Patrick Allen and Sam Kydd in the Morocco-based police series, Crane, which ran from 1963 to 1965 on ITV. In this he played the character Colonel Sharif Mahmoud. 

Flood also appeared in a number of television and film roles over the years. These included the ITC series The Champions and Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased), The Rat Catchers,  Tom Brown's Schooldays and was also in Bachelor Father. His film credits included Smokescreen (1964), Patton (1970), and Frightmare (1974).

Gerald Flood died from a heart attack aged 61. Toby Flood, the English international rugby union player, is Flood's grandson.



Aimée Delamain (died 1999 aged 93) would have been 111 - credited as Doña Arana in The Two Doctors

Actress who appeared in The Two Doctors


 Deaths
David Myerscough-Jones (died 2010 aged 75) - 3 credits, including Designer for The Ambassadors of Death

David Myerscough-Jones was Designer for three stories in the classic series. He first worked on the 1968 second Doctor story The Web of Fear. Set in a London tube station, the BBC refused to pay the high fee demanded to film in the actual location so Myerscough-Jones was given the task of replicating the London Underground system in a television studio. He achieved this so admirably, with a replica so lifelike, that the BBC received a letter of complaint from London Underground alleging that filming had taken place on their property without permission.

In 1970 he returned to the series working on the third Doctor story The Ambassadors of Death and two years later he worked on Day of the Daleks were he was responsible for designing rooms in a stately home as wall a a futuristic control centre.

Outside of Doctor Who, Myerscough-Jones has a long successful career. His most notable achievement was designing the sets for a television version of Britten’s opera Peter Grimes.



Terry Walsh (died 2002 aged 62) - 36 credits, including Fight Arranger for The Time Warrior

Terry Walsh  was a British actor stuntman, stunt arranger and fight arranger best know for hos work on Doctor Who during the 60's and 70's where he stunt-doubled for Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker.

Walsh was also the stunt co-ordinator for Robin of Sherwood, devising three swordfighting sequences which subsequently became standard movements on television and film. The moves were known as Robin Hood 1, 2 and 3.

His other credits include The Sandbaggers, Tales of the Unexpected, Z-Cars, Space: 1999, Dixon of Dock Green and Softly, Softly.